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The Cargo Cult of Business Comments http://www.cargocult.biz Clothes for discriminating CEOs Tue, 19 Jan 2021 05:23:05 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=1.5 by: Bettie Andrew http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/quote-of-the-day-maybe-the-decade-107/#comment-3392 Wed, 07 Mar 2012 08:25:51 -0500 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/quote-of-the-day-maybe-the-decade-107/#comment-3392 Simply a smiling visitor here to share the love (:, btw outstanding style. "The price one pays for pursuing a profession, or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side." by James Arthur Baldwin. Simply a smiling visitor here to share the love (:, btw outstanding style. “The price one pays for pursuing a profession, or calling, is an intimate knowledge of its ugly side.” by James Arthur Baldwin.

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by: Gregory Despain http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/uncategorized/danny-hillis-get-a-job-88/#comment-2280 Sat, 29 May 2010 15:01:43 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/uncategorized/danny-hillis-get-a-job-88/#comment-2280 my God, i thought you were going to chip in with some decisive insght at the end there, not leave it with ‘we leave it to you to decide’. my God, i thought you were going to chip in with some decisive insght at the end there, not leave it with ‘we leave it to you to decide’.

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by: Salina Thacher http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/listening-to-experts-100/#comment-2148 Sat, 27 Feb 2010 10:25:02 -0500 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/listening-to-experts-100/#comment-2148 Great article, thank you. I am very interested in finding a diet that lowers my sugar intake. I currently have a sweet-tooth, and am finding it difficult to find meal plans, what to eat for snacks, etc. While diabetes is not something that runs in my family, I am still concerned and would like to be smart and take a proactive approach to my health. Great article, thank you. I am very interested in finding a diet that lowers my sugar intake. I currently have a sweet-tooth, and am finding it difficult to find meal plans, what to eat for snacks, etc. While diabetes is not something that runs in my family, I am still concerned and would like to be smart and take a proactive approach to my health.

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by: Bethanie Miceli http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/getting-voip-78/#comment-1912 Mon, 15 Feb 2010 17:36:18 -0500 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/getting-voip-78/#comment-1912 I've utilised Skype for a few years now, and I have got to state that the quality of their service has really been dropping since they were bought. For now I will stay with them since I have a good deal of friends who are also on Skype. But I am studying alternatives. I’ve utilised Skype for a few years now, and I have got to state that the quality of their service has really been dropping since they were bought. For now I will stay with them since I have a good deal of friends who are also on Skype. But I am studying alternatives.

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by: Janne Laakso http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/kn-masters-of-deceptive-marketing-95/#comment-714 Thu, 29 Nov 2007 04:34:22 -0500 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/kn-masters-of-deceptive-marketing-95/#comment-714 I came across this article when looking for info on K&N products. You make some interesting notes, but they don't quite hold water. It may be that every car manufacturer uses paper-element filters, but that's only because car makers get more money when they sell more and more filters when these cars are being serviced. If they equipped their cars with re-usable filters, they'd have no after market for their own filters. You should also consider the fact that every time you take a Merceds, BMW, Ferrari or any other car to a tuner shop (Carlsson, Hamann etc.) they equip the car with a cotton gauze filter. Not because they want to sell more filters, but because they want to make the cars better. I came across this article when looking for info on K&N products. You make some interesting notes, but they don’t quite hold water.

It may be that every car manufacturer uses paper-element filters, but that’s only because car makers get more money when they sell more and more filters when these cars are being serviced. If they equipped their cars with re-usable filters, they’d have no after market for their own filters.

You should also consider the fact that every time you take a Merceds, BMW, Ferrari or any other car to a tuner shop (Carlsson, Hamann etc.) they equip the car with a cotton gauze filter. Not because they want to sell more filters, but because they want to make the cars better.

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by: John http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/listening-to-experts-100/#comment-707 Thu, 27 Sep 2007 09:57:43 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/listening-to-experts-100/#comment-707 This applies to internal experts as well. I know many very highly skilled IT folks who dread interactions with "power users." It's unusual to hear of a case where a CIO or Director of Technology will attempt to interfere in the workings of say the accounting department or argue about the way sales calls are handled. The opposite is unfortunately not true; everyone who has read an article about wifi on MSN.com or PCWorld on Friday afternoon will be in the CEO's office on Monday morning criticising the way the company wireless network is set up. I'm not in favor of blindly accepting authority or expertise, but I do think we owe each other a little respect. This applies to internal experts as well. I know many very highly skilled IT folks who dread interactions with “power users.”

It’s unusual to hear of a case where a CIO or Director of Technology will attempt to interfere in the workings of say the accounting department or argue about the way sales calls are handled. The opposite is unfortunately not true; everyone who has read an article about wifi on MSN.com or PCWorld on Friday afternoon will be in the CEO’s office on Monday morning criticising the way the company wireless network is set up.

I’m not in favor of blindly accepting authority or expertise, but I do think we owe each other a little respect.

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by: John http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/seven-wonders-of-the-internet-96/#comment-706 Sun, 08 Jul 2007 02:01:06 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/seven-wonders-of-the-internet-96/#comment-706 They've done pretty well really, if you can look past the "cats in sinks" to the point I think they're trying to make. Spam though? I suppose if there are "no rules" -- but thats like including Love Canal along with the Great Pyramids or the Taj Mahal or whatever... yuck. They’ve done pretty well really, if you can look past the “cats in sinks” to the point I think they’re trying to make.

Spam though? I suppose if there are “no rules” — but thats like including Love Canal along with the Great Pyramids or the Taj Mahal or whatever…

yuck.

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by: john http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/smart-elephant-52/#comment-375 Mon, 30 Oct 2006 13:46:58 -0500 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/smart-elephant-52/#comment-375 The problem isn't so much the treadmill as the peanuts. Also, too many people have the impression that there's some other goal toward which they're working in a corporate job, not so. That paycheck or direct deposit IS what you're working toward, and every pay period starts it up again. You'd better make darn sure you're being paid enough and not working under the mistaken impression that a grateful employer will make it up to you someday. As Paul likes to say, "the only conscience of a corporation is profit" (or something to that effect), similarly the only gratitude of a corporation is your compensation. <i>["The only conscience of a corporation is the limits set by law" -- Paul]<i /> The problem isn’t so much the treadmill as the peanuts.

Also, too many people have the impression that there’s some other goal toward which they’re working in a corporate job, not so. That paycheck or direct deposit IS what you’re working toward, and every pay period starts it up again. You’d better make darn sure you’re being paid enough and not working under the mistaken impression that a grateful employer will make it up to you someday.

As Paul likes to say, “the only conscience of a corporation is profit” (or something to that effect), similarly the only gratitude of a corporation is your compensation.

[”The only conscience of a corporation is the limits set by law” — Paul]

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by: caROL http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/aspartame-34/#comment-170 Mon, 19 Jun 2006 21:03:21 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/aspartame-34/#comment-170 In regard to Wendy's lemonade w/ aspartame-I am furious at the change to "Light" only and will be calling Wendy's tomorrow to complain. I had some yesterday not knowing it has aspartame(no one tells you) and came home and had to sleep for several hours Sunday-it shut me down-I can't eat it-they're going to end up with a lawsuit if they don't tell their employees to notify consumers what they are consuming-they shouldn't assume everyone is ok w/ artificial sweetners In regard to Wendy’s lemonade w/ aspartame-I am furious at the change to “Light” only and will be calling Wendy’s tomorrow to complain. I had some yesterday not knowing it has aspartame(no one tells you) and came home and had to sleep for several hours Sunday-it shut me down-I can’t eat it-they’re going to end up with a lawsuit if they don’t tell their employees to notify consumers what they are consuming-they shouldn’t assume everyone is ok w/ artificial sweetners

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by: Oliver http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/quick-notes-on-fuel-efficient-cars-59/#comment-169 Mon, 12 Jun 2006 12:36:25 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/quick-notes-on-fuel-efficient-cars-59/#comment-169 The Economist Magazine's Technology Quarterly issue (10 June 2006 cover date) has an interesting article on 'plug-in hybrids'. These are being created by hackers from Toyota Priuses and other commercially available hybrids. They allow wall-current charging as well as charge-while-driving. The otherwise-excellent article does have one glaring error - it says you can recharge the card at night, when electric rates are low. Does anyone know of a location in the US where ordinary retail consumers are offered time-sensitive electric rates? It's not on offer in Silicon Valley. Cheers! Oliver The Economist Magazine’s Technology Quarterly issue (10 June 2006 cover date) has an interesting article on ‘plug-in hybrids’. These are being created by hackers from Toyota Priuses and other commercially available hybrids. They allow wall-current charging as well as charge-while-driving.

The otherwise-excellent article does have one glaring error - it says you can recharge the card at night, when electric rates are low. Does anyone know of a location in the US where ordinary retail consumers are offered time-sensitive electric rates? It’s not on offer in Silicon Valley.

Cheers!
Oliver

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by: Oliver http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/smart-elephant-52/#comment-168 Mon, 12 Jun 2006 12:28:32 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/smart-elephant-52/#comment-168 Treadmills aren't unique to corporate life. Ask a farmer. Plant, weed, harvest, repeat. The plain truth is, we usually get paid more for doing things we're modestly good at, compared to what I'd get paid for, say, playing the guitar. And how does one get good at something? Practice, aka repetition. One should logically expect to do more-or-less the same work over and over again. It's what you're good at. Want some variety? Teach yourself to be good at something else. On your dime, on your time. Cheers! Oliver Treadmills aren’t unique to corporate life. Ask a farmer. Plant, weed, harvest, repeat.

The plain truth is, we usually get paid more for doing things we’re modestly good at, compared to what I’d get paid for, say, playing the guitar.

And how does one get good at something? Practice, aka repetition. One should logically expect to do more-or-less the same work over and over again. It’s what you’re good at.

Want some variety? Teach yourself to be good at something else. On your dime, on your time.

Cheers!
Oliver

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by: Oliver http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/career-networking-no-quotes-46/#comment-126 Fri, 28 Apr 2006 12:25:55 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/career-networking-no-quotes-46/#comment-126 I'll be brief. Calling people you don't knwo to ask for favors _may_ be aggressive; it would depend on the circumstance. However, I didn't suggest that. I did suggest doing up one's homework and being in a position to offer something of value to the person you're calling. Surely you have some skill or talent that the person you're calling, or his organization, can use? If not, that might be something to work on. It's interesting tha you presume an unemployed person is powerless to contribute to my financial gain. Quite the contrary. While there can be some rivalry, I know from my own experience and that of others that there's much to be gained by both parties in trading leads, tips, ideas, resources, etc. You have info which may not be useful to you but is to him, and vice versa. Why not share? Broadly speaking, one has "friends" - people one knows well and chooses to spend time with; "acquaintances" - people you know but aren't especially close to (perhaps a neighbor); and "business associates" who may be colleageus, co-workers, vendors, customers, or any of the legion of folks we encounter in our work lives. I would agree that pestering acquaintances is an area that requires the most thought and care as to social appropriateness. As for friends, if one's friends won't help you in a job search, get new friends. This leaves business associates. By definition, these are the folks with whom we buy, sell, exchange, and trade. When a sales person calls you - or you call him - the presumption of business intent is assumed. Suppose you leave your job, or it leaves you, and you call a former vendor. Would he be upset that you called? It's unlikely. He has every reason to assist you in your job search. Not only does it give him the enormous emotional satisfaction of helping a fellow human being in his hour of need (which we shall assume is his primary motivation) but he is aware that you are unlikely to buy any more product until you are once again employed. Ringo, you need not engage in social networking as part of your next job search. It isn't required by law. If you dislike it, by all means don't do it. But don't presume that other who do engage in it are insufferable rude or busy annoying each other. It's possible they're engaging in a collective exercise in mutual co-operation and benefit. As for your view of hiring via networking, I agree that it biases the pool. Thus, when I call friends and ask who's _really, really_ good at the skill I need. I bias the pool toward RR good people. I can live with this. Furthermore, it's often the case that the best people are currently employed and not necessarily looking. One doesn't find them without networking. Cheers! Oliver I’ll be brief. Calling people you don’t knwo to ask for favors _may_ be aggressive; it would depend on the circumstance. However, I didn’t suggest that. I did suggest doing up one’s homework and being in a position to offer something of value to the person you’re calling. Surely you have some skill or talent that the person you’re calling, or his organization, can use? If not, that might be something to work on.

It’s interesting tha you presume an unemployed person is powerless to contribute to my financial gain. Quite the contrary. While there can be some rivalry, I know from my own experience and that of others that there’s much to be gained by both parties in trading leads, tips, ideas, resources, etc. You have info which may not be useful to you but is to him, and vice versa. Why not share?

Broadly speaking, one has “friends” - people one knows well and chooses to spend time with; “acquaintances” - people you know but aren’t especially close to (perhaps a neighbor); and “business associates” who may be colleageus, co-workers, vendors, customers, or any of the legion of folks we encounter in our work lives.

I would agree that pestering acquaintances is an area that requires the most thought and care as to social appropriateness. As for friends, if one’s friends won’t help you in a job search, get new friends.

This leaves business associates. By definition, these are the folks with whom we buy, sell, exchange, and trade. When a sales person calls you - or you call him - the presumption of business intent is assumed. Suppose you leave your job, or it leaves you, and you call a former vendor. Would he be upset that you called? It’s unlikely. He has every reason to assist you in your job search. Not only does it give him the enormous emotional satisfaction of helping a fellow human being in his hour of need (which we shall assume is his primary motivation) but he is aware that you are unlikely to buy any more product until you are once again employed.

Ringo, you need not engage in social networking as part of your next job search. It isn’t required by law. If you dislike it, by all means don’t do it. But don’t presume that other who do engage in it are insufferable rude or busy annoying each other. It’s possible they’re engaging in a collective exercise in mutual co-operation and benefit.

As for your view of hiring via networking, I agree that it biases the pool. Thus, when I call friends and ask who’s _really, really_ good at the skill I need. I bias the pool toward RR good people. I can live with this. Furthermore, it’s often the case that the best people are currently employed and not necessarily looking. One doesn’t find them without networking.

Cheers!
Oliver

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by: Ringo http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/career-networking-no-quotes-46/#comment-125 Fri, 28 Apr 2006 09:10:35 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/career-networking-no-quotes-46/#comment-125 Oliver, Yes, calling people you don't know to ask for favors is aggressive. Suggesting a lunch meeting with a former colleague varies. Would you do so even if you knew they were unemployed and powerless to contribute to your financial gain? If the answer is yes, then there's nothing wrong with it... unless the answer is "yes, you never know when some schmuck might hit the lottery or get promoted to CEO." (In which case it's not so much aggressive as cynical.) I would also dispute the point that the other person knows exactly what one is doing (when networking) and is "doing it too". To the extent that may be true, I say let the "consenting adults" principal rule, but it seems to me it calls for disclosure. Perhaps one could say, "I'm feigning a social interest in you for business purposes; if you'd like to reciprocate by pretending to tolerate me for potential financial gain, please do." In regards to your remark about sincerity, I think you've become confused in a way which is somewhat ironic for this venue. Sincerity doesn't depend upon whether you wish someone well or ill. The crux of it is lack of pretense or affectation. One could sincerely "wish [someone] great evil." Here's the bottom line: In so far as I know, there is no final arbiter for rudeness, nor for the kind of world we all want to live in. That means I can't prove my assertion that career networking is rude. I also can’t prove that the social and business environment to which it leads is undesirable. I can, and have, and might again, point out and illustrate how rude and undesirable it is to me. I say calling people one doesn’t know, pestering people at social functions to sell them something or ask for a job, pretending a personal interest in people in order to advance one’s career, and begging favors at every turn is rude. When that crosses the barrier between work/business and home/social life, the rudeness is extreme. I don't want a world that works that way, but clearly some people do. From my point of view networking, line (queue) cutting, and telemarketing are of a piece and more or less equally rude. However, when it comes to sheer damage to quality of life I'll take the line cutters and the telemarketers every time, they do less damage. Ringo ps. Oh, in regard to using networking for hiring decisions, that dog won't hunt. If you bias the applicant pool you bias the outcome. --r Oliver,

Yes, calling people you don’t know to ask for favors is aggressive. Suggesting a lunch meeting with a former colleague varies. Would you do so even if you knew they were unemployed and powerless to contribute to your financial gain? If the answer is yes, then there’s nothing wrong with it… unless the answer is “yes, you never know when some schmuck might hit the lottery or get promoted to CEO.” (In which case it’s not so much aggressive as cynical.)

I would also dispute the point that the other person knows exactly what one is doing (when networking) and is “doing it too”. To the extent that may be true, I say let the “consenting adults” principal rule, but it seems to me it calls for disclosure. Perhaps one could say, “I’m feigning a social interest in you for business purposes; if you’d like to reciprocate by pretending to tolerate me for potential financial gain, please do.”

In regards to your remark about sincerity, I think you’ve become confused in a way which is somewhat ironic for this venue. Sincerity doesn’t depend upon whether you wish someone well or ill. The crux of it is lack of pretense or affectation. One could sincerely “wish [someone] great evil.”

Here’s the bottom line: In so far as I know, there is no final arbiter for rudeness, nor for the kind of world we all want to live in. That means I can’t prove my assertion that career networking is rude. I also can’t prove that the social and business environment to which it leads is undesirable. I can, and have, and might again, point out and illustrate how rude and undesirable it is to me.

I say calling people one doesn’t know, pestering people at social functions to sell them something or ask for a job, pretending a personal interest in people in order to advance one’s career, and begging favors at every turn is rude. When that crosses the barrier between work/business and home/social life, the rudeness is extreme. I don’t want a world that works that way, but clearly some people do.

From my point of view networking, line (queue) cutting, and telemarketing are of a piece and more or less equally rude. However, when it comes to sheer damage to quality of life I’ll take the line cutters and the telemarketers every time, they do less damage.

Ringo

ps. Oh, in regard to using networking for hiring decisions, that dog won’t hunt. If you bias the applicant pool you bias the outcome. –r

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by: John http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/aspartame-34/#comment-119 Wed, 26 Apr 2006 20:17:45 -0400 http://www.cargocult.biz/archives/the-cargo-cults-of-business/aspartame-34/#comment-119 I think I noted before that whether the stuff is hazardous or not, it tastes terrible. Jane Galt at http://www.janegalt.net is having an unusual experience... she used to like the stuff, and now finds it disgusting. Interesting. I think I noted before that whether the stuff is hazardous or not, it tastes terrible. Jane Galt at http://www.janegalt.net is having an unusual experience… she used to like the stuff, and now finds it disgusting. Interesting.

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